Newsworthy Articles

The Trade-offs of Teamwork among STEM Doctoral Graduates

Kniffin, K. M., & Hanks, A. S. (2018). The trade-offs of teamwork among STEM doctoral graduates. American Psychologist, 73(4), 420-432. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000288

Teamwork has increasingly become prevalent in professional fields such as academic science, perhaps partly because research shows that teams tend to produce superior work. Although research on teamwork has typically focused on its impact on work products, the authors complement that work by examining the degree to which teamwork influences salary, hours worked, and overall job satisfaction. Drawing on microdata collected through the National Science Foundation’s Survey of Doctorate Recipients as well as the Survey of Earned Doctorates, the authors find that doctoral degree holders in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields tend to earn substantially higher salaries and work more hours when they engage in teamwork.

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Report Pushes for Big Change in Graduate STEM Ed

National Academies report urges program data transparency and a focus on core competencies.

U.S. graduate education in science, technology, engineering and math is, in many ways, the “gold standard” for the world. But it can and must better prepare graduates for a changing science landscape and multiple careers. It should also be more transparent in terms of where graduates end up working. So says a major new report on the future of graduate STEM education from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The report was drafted by the Committee on Revitalizing Graduate STEM Education for the 21st Century, chaired by Alan Leshner, chief executive officer emeritus of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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Congratulations to UCLA’s Inaugural CIRTL-Certified Scholars!

Congratulations to Jenny Link (top photo) and Elizabeth Reid-Wainscoat (bottom photo) for completing the Scholar Level certification for UCLA’s Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) – a prestigious national program sponsored by UCLA Graduate Division in collaboration with CEILS supporting the professional development of UCLA graduate students and postdoctoral scholars. CIRTL Certification requires training and coursework in effective and inclusive teaching practices, culminating in a teaching-as-research projec

 

 

Jenny Link is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Medicine and also a current UPLIFT fellow. Her teaching-as-research project is titled: “Recurrent and varied in-class activities help students retain information in a lower division evolution, biodiversity, and ecology course.”

 

 

Elizabeth Reid-Wainscoat is a Masters candidate in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Her teaching-as-research project is titled “Does temperament composition impact group dynamics in an upper division biology lab course?”. Both presented their work to the CEILS journal club this Spring.

Congrats, Jenny and Elizabeth!
Learn more about CIRTL and this prestigious credential here.